PR Toolkit

get news coverage

Marketing and Public Information is responsible for the official "voice of Edmonds College." We release news, write guest editorials, and manage relationships with the media.

It is very important to involve us in all college-related communications with representatives of the news media. We will help you prepare for interviews and help ensure accuracy and consistency in public statements.

Please refer all media inquiries to: 

Marisa Pierce, director of Marketing and Public Information

425.640.1697 office | 425.697.0341 cell | marisa.pierce@edcc.edu

Share your story

Email or call with your news. We'd rather have too much than too little. 

What's news? Think:

  • New: a new program, class, or activity
  • Big: lots of people, money, or impact
  • Unusual: the oldest, youngest, first, last, only one of its kind
  • People: a personal, unique, emotional story
  • Buzz: what people are talking about, the first thing you tell your friends and family about your day at the college

We can also help you write guest editorials or contribute to a regular feature in a newspaper.

Ask students to tell us about themselves through our online form.

Interview tips

Before your interview:

  • Contact Marketing and Public Information. We can help draft responses and arrange the best possible location for video interviews.
  • Gain a clear understanding of the story's subject matter and angle. If it is in your area of expertise, feel free to respond. If the topic is outside your area of expertise, politely decline and refer to someone else. If the subject matter is negative or controversial, or if for any reason you feel uncomfortable responding, please contact us for assistance.
  • Develop two or three key messages you would like to get across during the interview. Jot down likely questions and think of ways to address them while working in those key messages.

During your interview:

  • Repeat your key messages (in different ways) at each available opportunity.
  • Mention Edmonds College when possible.
  • Keep your messages clear and concise. Use short and easily understood words and develop quick and to-the-point sound bites. You only have a brief window of opportunity to make an impression (a 10-20 second sound bite in a television/radio report, and two or three sentences in each newspaper quote).
  • If you need time to collect your thoughts or retrieve supporting information, set an agreed-upon time to call back (the sooner the better). Example: "I need to gather some information before the interview. I should have it assembled in 15 minutes. Will it work for you if I call you back at 10:30?" 
  • Encourage the reporter to call you back for clarification or follow-up questions.